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Help & Advice


What Size Are My Tyres?

If you are wondering what size your tyres are, you can usually find this information on the sidewall of the tyre itself. Tyres are labeled with a series of numbers and letters that indicate their size, load capacity, and speed rating.

The size of your tyres is typically indicated by a combination of numbers and letters. For example, a common tyre size is 205/55R16. The first part of this label, "205," refers to the tyre's width in millimetres. The second part, "55," refers to the aspect ratio of the tyre, which is the height of the sidewall as a percentage of the tyre's width. The third part, "R16," indicates that the tyre is a radial tyre with a diameter of 16 inches.

It's important to make sure that you select the right size of tyres for your vehicle. Using the wrong size tyres can lead to a range of problems, including reduced performance, increased fuel consumption, and even safety issues.

If you are unsure what size tyres are right for your vehicle, consult your owner's manual or contact a tyre specialist for guidance. They will be able to help you find the right size tyres for your vehicle and ensure that they are installed correctly.

What’s The Legal Minimum Depth of Tread For Car Tyres?

In the UK, the legal minimum depth of tread for car tyres is 1.6mm. This means that the tyre tread must be at least 1.6mm deep across the central three-quarters of the tyre's width, as well as around the entire circumference of the tyre.

It's important to note that this is the minimum legal requirement and that tyres with tread depths below this limit are not considered safe for use on the road. In fact, many tyre manufacturers recommend replacing tyres when the tread depth reaches 3mm to ensure optimal safety and performance.

Having sufficient tread depth on your tyres is crucial for maintaining good traction and grip on the road, particularly in wet or slippery conditions. Tyres with worn or balding treads can lead to reduced handling, longer stopping distances, and an increased risk of aquaplaning, which can cause loss of control of the vehicle.

To ensure that your tyres are safe and legal, it's important to regularly check the tread depth and replace your tyres when they reach the minimum legal limit or earlier if recommended by the tyre manufacturer. You can use a tread depth gauge or the built-in wear indicators in your tyres to check the depth of your tyre treads.

What Should My Tyre Pressure Be?

The correct tyre pressure for your vehicle can vary depending on the make and model of your car, as well as the type of tyres you are using. However, you can typically find the recommended tyre pressure for your vehicle in your owner's manual or on a sticker located on the inside of the driver's side door.

The recommended tyre pressure is usually given in pounds per square inch (PSI) or bar, and it is important to maintain the correct pressure in all four tyres for optimal safety, performance, and fuel efficiency.

Underinflated tyres can cause increased fuel consumption, reduced handling, and premature wear, while overinflated tyres can lead to reduced traction, a harsher ride, and increased risk of tyre damage or blowouts. To ensure that your tyres are inflated to the correct pressure, you can use a tyre pressure gauge to measure the current pressure of each tyre, and then adjust the pressure as needed using a tyre inflator or air compressor.

It's recommended to check your tyre pressure at least once a month and before long journeys, and to ensure that your tyres are not excessively worn or damaged. If you are unsure about the correct tyre pressure for your vehicle or have any concerns about your tyres, it's recommended to seek the advice of a qualified tyre specialist.

How to Check Tyre Pressure?

Checking your tyre pressure is an important part of maintaining your vehicle's safety and performance. Here are the steps you can follow to check your tyre pressure:

  • Find the recommended tyre pressure for your vehicle: You can find the recommended tyre pressure in your owner's manual or on a sticker located on the inside of the driver's side door. Make sure to note the recommended PSI or bar for your front and rear tyres.
  • Check the current pressure of your tyres: Use a tyre pressure gauge to check the current pressure of each tyre. Unscrew the valve cap on the tyre and press the gauge onto the valve stem. You should hear a hissing sound as air escapes from the tyre and into the gauge. Once the hissing sound stops, the gauge should display the current pressure.
  • Compare the current pressure to the recommended pressure: Compare the current pressure of each tyre to the recommended pressure for your vehicle. If the pressure is lower than recommended, you will need to add air to the tyre. If the pressure is higher than recommended, you will need to release air from the tyre.
  • Inflate or deflate the tyres as needed: Use a tyre inflator or air compressor to add air to or release air from the tyres as needed. Check the pressure again with the gauge after inflating or deflating to ensure that the tyre pressure is at the recommended level.
  • Repeat the process for all four tyres: Check the pressure of all four tyres and adjust as needed. Make sure to replace the valve caps on each tyre when finished.

It's recommended to check your tyre pressure at least once a month and before long journeys, as well as to ensure that your tyres are not excessively worn or damaged. If you are unsure about the correct tyre pressure for your vehicle or have any concerns about your tyres, it's recommended to seek the advice of a qualified tyre specialist.

When Should Tyre Pressures Be Checked?

To maintain optimal safety, performance, and fuel efficiency, it's recommended to check your tyre pressure at least once a month and before long journeys. Underinflated tyres can cause increased fuel consumption, reduced handling, and premature wear, while overinflated tyres can lead to reduced traction, a harsher ride, and increased risk of tyre damage or blowouts.

It's also important to regularly check your tyres for any signs of damage, such as cuts, bulges, or punctures, and to ensure that your tyre treads are not worn down below the legal minimum depth. You should also adjust your tyre pressure when carrying heavy loads or towing a trailer.

A tyre pressure gauge is recommended for checking your tyre pressure, and if you are unsure about how to do it, or have any concerns about your tyres, it's best to seek the advice of a qualified tyre specialist.

Overall, regular tyre maintenance and monitoring can help to ensure the safe and efficient operation of your vehicle.

How Long Do Tyres Last?

The lifespan of a tyre can vary depending on a variety of factors, including the quality of the tyre, driving habits, road conditions, and climate. However, as a general rule of thumb, most tyre manufacturers recommend replacing your tyres every 6 years, even if they have not reached the legal minimum tread depth.

In addition to the recommended time frame, you should also check your tyres for signs of wear and damage on a regular basis. Tyre treads should not be worn down below the legal minimum depth of 1.6mm, as this can compromise the safety and handling of your vehicle, especially in wet or slippery conditions.

Other signs of tyre wear and damage include cracks, bulges, punctures, and uneven wear. If you notice any of these signs, it's important to have your tyres inspected by a qualified tyre specialist, who can advise you on whether your tyres need to be replaced or repaired.

It's also important to follow good driving habits and to maintain your tyres properly, including checking your tyre pressure regularly, rotating your tyres every 5,000 to 8,000 miles, and having your wheels balanced and aligned when needed. These steps can help to extend the lifespan of your tyres and to ensure that they are performing optimally.

What Are Run Flat Tyres?

Run flat tyres, or self-supporting tyres, are a type of tyre that allows you to continue driving for a limited distance even after a puncture or loss of air pressure. They have reinforced sidewalls that support the weight of the vehicle even when there's no air pressure in the tyre. This allows you to drive at a reduced speed, usually up to 50 mph, for a limited distance of about 50 miles to reach a safe location or a tyre repair facility.

Run flat tyres are typically fitted as original equipment on many newer vehicles and can reduce the risk of a sudden tyre failure or blowout, which can be dangerous and costly, especially at high speeds. Run flat tyres can also eliminate the need for a spare tyre, reducing the weight of the vehicle and increasing trunk space.

However, run flat tyres have some downsides. They can be more expensive than traditional tyres, and their stiffer sidewalls can result in a harsher ride. If a run flat tyre is punctured or damaged beyond repair, it must be replaced rather than repaired, which can be more costly.

Run flat tyres may be suitable for drivers who prioritise safety and convenience, but they may not be the best choice for everyone. It's recommended to consult a qualified tyre specialist who can advise you on whether they are a good fit for your needs and driving habits.

Can You Repair Run Flat Tyres?

Repairing run flat tyres can be a controversial topic, as it largely depends on the extent of the damage and the manufacturer's recommendations. Generally speaking, it is not recommended to repair run flat tyres, especially if they have been driven on while flat or with very low pressure. This is because the reinforced sidewalls of run flat tyres can be damaged in such situations, making the tyre unsuitable for repair.

However, some tyre manufacturers do offer guidelines for repairing run flat tyres under certain circumstances. For example, some minor punctures in the tread area of the tyre may be repairable, as long as the tyre has not been driven on while flat and the puncture is not too close to the sidewall.

It's important to note that even if a run flat tyre can be repaired, it's still recommended to replace it as soon as possible, as the tyre's integrity may have been compromised. It's also worth noting that not all tyre repair shops are equipped to repair run flat tyres, so it's important to find a qualified tyre specialist who has experience working with this type of tyre.

Overall, while it may be possible to repair some run flat tyres under certain circumstances, it's generally not recommended. If you suspect that your run flat tyre has been damaged or punctured, it's best to consult a qualified tyre specialist who can advise you on the best course of action.


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